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Why Are Certain Brain Tumors More Common in Men?

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As modern human beings, we have a lot to worry about on a daily basis. There is a lot of debate as to which sex has more to deal with, but it turns out that some brain tumors are more common in men than in women. One of the most common and invasive forms of tumor, known as glioblastomas, is found in males more often than in females, but why is that? According to the latest research, the exact reasons are still unclear. However, diligent experts are now shedding some light on the matter, helping men everywhere get a better handle on their neurological health.


What Is a Brain Tumor?


First of all, you have to understand exactly what brain tumors are in order to grasp the idea of why they would be more prevalent in one sex than in the other. Essentially, brain tumors are nothing more than a mass of abnormal brain cells. Since the brain is inside the skull, which is an enclosed space, having a growth on the brain can be very dangerous if left untreated. Some tumors can be malignant (cancerous) or benign (non-cancerous), but treatment is usually needed to remove them, regardless.


The Plight of Sluggish Proteins


A lot of modern men regularly use protein supplements to fill the gaps in their diets before or after a strenuous workout, but often they are unaware of how little protein they actually have, at least in their brains. Recent studies have found that a particularly important protein, which is linked to a reduction in the risk of developing cancers and brain tumors (retinoblastoma protein, or RB), is actually less actively produced in male brains than in female ones. These sluggish proteins even make tumors more aggressive in some men, which is why brain health is so important regardless of age.


The Genetic Key


Scientists have been trying to determine whether or not there are any other causes for the problem in men’s brains, and as it turns out that genetic makeup has a lot to do with it. In fact, there are three genes that have been directly linked to lowering tumor development: p53, RB, and neurofibromin. These genetic markers are unfortunately mutated or completely disabled in many modern men. Having a doctor explain further the details of your genetic map would be most beneficial, especially if you are worried about developing brain tumors.